officialhomosexuality

archatlas:


"I don’t want to be interesting. I want to be good."

Happy Birthday Ludwig Mies van der Rohe!

"Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886-1969), a German-born architect and educator, is widely acknowledged as one of the 20th century’s greatest architects. By emphasizing open space and revealing the industrial materials used in construction, he helped define modern architecture.

Our built environment is meant to be lived in. Mies’ buildings, beyond merely affecting our lives, endow them with greater significance and beauty. His buildings radiate the confidence, rationality, and elegance of their creator and, free of ornamentation and excess, confess the essential elements of our lives. In our time, where there is no limit to excess, Mies’ reductionist approach is as pertinent as ever. As we reduce the distractions and focus on the essential elements of our environment and ourselves, we find they are great, intricate, and beautiful. Less is more.” [via]

Photo credits found here 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Can I just say something? Van der Rohe was like Zoolander: he only had one look #bluesteel

My favourite blog, Expolounge, uses the medium of film to explain the history of that giant golfball at Parc Jean-Drapeau - otherwise known as the United States Pavilion of Expo 67 or the Montreal Biosphère. The Biosphère is an environmental museum managed by the federal Government of Canada and is focussed on the ecosystem of the Saint-Lawrence River. It’s worth checking out.

decoarchitecture
decoarchitecture:

Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, CanadaHistoric 1928 Photo
This photo is just amazing. This complex was built with nothing around it. Compare to this modern-day Google Maps aerial view.
Caption from Art Deco digital collection at McGill:
A photograph of the Université de Montréal campus in an aerial view, ca. 1928. Architect Ernest Cormier  (1885-1980) is well-known for his central complex of buildings at the  Université de Montréal, considered to be of Art Deco design. It is a  composition of simple forms of planes and surfaces in successive relief,  emphasizing vertical lines. The light buff vitrified brick has  trimmings of Missisquoi marble. Cormier’s former house on Pine Avenue in  Montreal is one of the finest examples of Art Deco homes in the world.  Student Papers Collection, Rare Books and Special Collections

decoarchitecture:

Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Historic 1928 Photo

This photo is just amazing. This complex was built with nothing around it. Compare to this modern-day Google Maps aerial view.

Caption from Art Deco digital collection at McGill:

A photograph of the Université de Montréal campus in an aerial view, ca. 1928.

Architect Ernest Cormier (1885-1980) is well-known for his central complex of buildings at the Université de Montréal, considered to be of Art Deco design. It is a composition of simple forms of planes and surfaces in successive relief, emphasizing vertical lines. The light buff vitrified brick has trimmings of Missisquoi marble.

Cormier’s former house on Pine Avenue in Montreal is one of the finest examples of Art Deco homes in the world.
Student Papers Collection, Rare Books and Special Collections