djgagnon-deactivated20130820
djgagnon: #Montreal #McGill #cdnhistory

Macdonald College, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec
William C Macdonald, a tobacco manufacturer established, designed and funded this agricultural college. Today it is known as the Macdonald Campus of McGill University. 
Macdonald was born on Prince Edward Island, and was the grandson of a Scottish laird. Under the name McDonald Brothers and Company, he and his brother made tremendous amounts of money during the US Civil War …
Most of the tobacco was then grown in the Confederate states, but men on the Union side of the conflict already had a tobacco habit - pipe and chewing tobacco. Macdonald’s Canadian enterprise was able to buy the southern tobacco, process and manufacture it in Montreal, then sell it to the northern states. 
His philanthropy to McGill University and other causes began in 1870.
Macdonald College was the finest agricultural college in Canada when it opened in 1907. This was during a time when most Canadians were established on farms and the prairie west was booming. Modern technologies and training adapted to all the varied climate, soil and cultural backgrounds of new settlers from Europe were in demand. Dairy farming was especially important in Quebec and Macdonald College was very involved in this agricultural specialty.
One of my dairy farm cousins from Lachute obtained his one year ‘Aggie’ diploma here. In the 1960s or 1970s, Aggie grads began celebrating by ‘tagging’ the higher elements of the nearby highway bridge over the Ottawa River.
Faced with the wave of Canadian Baby Boomers to educate during the considerable expansion of the school system … in the 1950s and 1960s, part of Macdonald College was used to train and certify school teachers. Both of my parents obtained their teaching certification here.

djgagnon: #Montreal #McGill #cdnhistory

Macdonald College, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec

William C Macdonald, a tobacco manufacturer established, designed and funded this agricultural college. Today it is known as the Macdonald Campus of McGill University.

Macdonald was born on Prince Edward Island, and was the grandson of a Scottish laird. Under the name McDonald Brothers and Company, he and his brother made tremendous amounts of money during the US Civil War …

Most of the tobacco was then grown in the Confederate states, but men on the Union side of the conflict already had a tobacco habit - pipe and chewing tobacco. Macdonald’s Canadian enterprise was able to buy the southern tobacco, process and manufacture it in Montreal, then sell it to the northern states.

His philanthropy to McGill University and other causes began in 1870.

Macdonald College was the finest agricultural college in Canada when it opened in 1907. This was during a time when most Canadians were established on farms and the prairie west was booming. Modern technologies and training adapted to all the varied climate, soil and cultural backgrounds of new settlers from Europe were in demand. Dairy farming was especially important in Quebec and Macdonald College was very involved in this agricultural specialty.

One of my dairy farm cousins from Lachute obtained his one year ‘Aggie’ diploma here. In the 1960s or 1970s, Aggie grads began celebrating by ‘tagging’ the higher elements of the nearby highway bridge over the Ottawa River.

Faced with the wave of Canadian Baby Boomers to educate during the considerable expansion of the school system … in the 1950s and 1960s, part of Macdonald College was used to train and certify school teachers. Both of my parents obtained their teaching certification here.

mcgilldiaries:

If you care to get a glimpse, this is what the life of a second-year Anatomy & Cell Biology student at McGill looks like on a good day.  On a side note, how attractive is my TATA-Box? (Of course, this is just from 3 lectures in 1 course. No need to tell me I have no life; that’s already been established.)

mcgilldiaries:

If you care to get a glimpse, this is what the life of a second-year Anatomy & Cell Biology student at McGill looks like on a good day.
On a side note, how attractive is my TATA-Box?
(Of course, this is just from 3 lectures in 1 course. No need to tell me I have no life; that’s already been established.)

Quebec - a great place for university research

This tumblr started as a whimsical experiment, and more of a replacement for posting links to Facebook than anything else. However, it’s rapidly became the cornerstone of my professional and personal communications – a looking glass that offers a glimpse into research at universities in Quebec and out to the cultural and geographical dimensions that colour my work and my life.

The name came to me as I was coming down from the Rutherford physics building at McGill. Rutherford, such a hearty sounding name. And a brilliant scientist who was born in New Zealand – I can’t claim much in common with the great man, but I can claim that. So can Katherine Mansfield. Mansfield was a poet and an artist who left Wellington to pursue her artistic interests in the South of France. I think the two names go together quite nicely, and the combination of their careers reflects the kind of juxtaposition I would like to offer my readers. The combination also sounds vaguely évocateur of the place names you find in Montréal.

Créer un compte tumblr, c’était pour moi question d’expérimenter avec les médias « sociaux » et surtout évoluer au-delà du simple partage des liens sur Facebook. Or, cet outil est rapidement devenu la pierre angulaire de mes communications professionnelles et personnelles – une vitrine qui vous permettra de découvrir la recherche scientifique entreprise par les universitaires québécois.

J’ai conçu le nouveau titre à la sortie du Pavillon Rutherford à McGill. Rutherford, ça comporte un certain cachet sonore. C’était un scientifique excellent né en Nouvelle-Zélande ; à part le lien McGill, c’est probablement la seule chose que j’ai en commun avec cette sommité de la physique. C’est également une racine que je partage avec Katherine Mansfield, une poète et une artiste qui a quitté Wellington pour s’installer dans le sud de la France afin de poursuivre sa carrière. Je trouve que les deux noms vont ensemble bien, et la conjugaison de leurs profils représentent bien celui du contenu que j’aimerais proposer à mes lecteurs. De coup, « Rutherford-Mansfield », c’est assez évocateur de la toponymie montréalaise, à mon avis.